Category: Personal Growth

Two Powerful Life Lessons I Learned this Past Year

fashion woman notebook pen
Photo by Negative Space on Pexels.com

There is nothing so powerful and important to our personal growth, as self-reflection, coupled with the ability to be truthful with ourselves. The ability to think deeply and to examine our self is not just powerful, but a gift. “The unexamined life is not worth living”, says Socrates.  How many of us were punished as children for telling lies? We were taught to always tell the truth. I am certain, however that most of us were not taught that it is just as important to be truthful with ourselves. 

As my birthday was approaching, I spent some time in self-reflection. I particularly examined my life over the past year. On my last birthday I shared about The 5 Most Important Lessons I Learned by Age 45. I want to make that kind of post, somewhat of a tradition here on Inspire. Thus, in celebration of this year’s birthday, I am sharing what I believe to be, the two most powerful life lessons I learned this past year.

Share this:

Successfully Managing Your Expectations

What are you expecting? There are some who believe that they should live life without any expectations at all. In that way there is little room for disappointment. But that is a bit unrealistic, don’t you think? We all live life with expectations, whether or not we are consciously aware of it. For example, we expect our children to behave in alignment with the upbringing and values we have instilled in them. We expect our spouse to be faithful or to fulfil certain needs. When we leave our homes in the morning, we expect to get to our destination safely. We expect to receive our pay cheque at the end of the month. Maybe, we are expecting a promotion, or a job offer. We may even be expecting a negative outcome from a recent encounter or project or life in general. Having expectations is unavoidable.

However, some of our expectations may be realistic and some may be unrealistic. Some may be healthy, and some may be unhealthy. Some expectations may serve us, while others may not. Since they all shape and impact our lives in one way or another, it behooves us to work at successfully managing our expectations. So, I ask you the question again, what are you expecting?

Share this:

Personal Growth and Sacrifice: Dying to Self

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

As I am writing this on Easter Sunday, I felt it would be a good time to talk about personal growth and sacrifice. Today, all of Christendom celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. What an awesome sacrifice Jesus made; it is the ultimate of all sacrifices. “Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends”, John 15:13. Not many of us would be willing to give up our life for a friend or relative or someone whom we love. But Jesus did. He chose to make such a sacrifice because He loves us.

A part of my blog’s main objective is to encourage personal growth. Personal growth has to be intentional; it does not happen by chance. I also believe that we do not experience personal growth without making some sacrifices. We do not experience personal growth, without first dying to some things within ourselves.

Share this:

Necessary Endings and How to Deal with Them

Photo by Tim Gouw on Pexels.com

How do you feel about endings? From both an intellectual and emotional standpoint? Does it make you sad, anxious, or even angry and regretful? Do you think of it as being practical, useful and necessary to allow for growth, improvement and, progress?  How do you feel about endings? When we have become invested and, attached to something, letting go can be difficult. Ending something can be difficult; especially if that ending is not of our own free will.

Share this:

Avoiding the Greatest Tragedy: Living a Life of Purpose

What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead.

Nelson Mandela

Nothing can be quite as challenging as dealing with the death of a loved one. It has a way of simultaneously testing us and putting life into perspective – fleeting, fragile.  The sudden passing of a young man whom I deeply respect and admire reminded me of this fact and led to much reflection and introspection.

Nelson Mandela, lived amidst the turbulence of racial prejudice and injustice, yet he was able to forgive his oppressors and lead a life that inspired so many. The preceding quote always resonates with me and causes me to reflect on the way I lead my own life. What kind of life am I leading? Have I made a difference in anybody’s life? Do I inspire growth and change in others? Am I living a life as God would have me live? What can I do better? In what areas do I need to improve?

What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived!  How are you living your life? Are you merely living? Or are you living a life of purpose? Are you living in such a way that you are making a difference in the lives of others?

Share this:

How to Fail Well: Dealing with the Pain of Failure

Photo by Green Chameleon on Unsplash

What is your attitude to failure? How do you react when you fail? Do you pout or cry? Do you blame others? Do you lose your temper? Do you recoil and never make another attempt? Are you so devastated that it takes you longer than it should, to get over it? Is your self-worth affected when you fail?

One of my favorite quotes says, “failure is an event, not a person.” This has been one of the most impactful lessons I have learned since I began being intentional about personal development.

We may have been taught that failing at something is a crisis to be endured. Maybe we were taught to look at failure as something negative; something to feel dirty and ashamed about. Sometimes the pressure to succeed is so great that failure can be extremely devastating for us, and we end up seeing ourselves as a failure. We ascribe feelings of guilt and shame to the experience and labels such as failure, not good enough or weak to ourselves. That failure then feeds into our self-doubts and insecurities. Because of this some of us hate to fail. I know I did. We would accept nothing but perfection.

Share this:

7 Sure Ways to Achieve Personal Development

Photo by Mikel Parera on Unsplash

In this article:

I have had this topic on my content list for a while now. However, a recent encounter indicated to me that it was time to write about it. A colleague indicated, that she was thinking of passing up an opportunity offered to her to work in another department. This is a colleague who is very good at what she does in her current position and who is also extremely reliable. But she feared leaving her comfort zone and learning new things. I encouraged her to seize the opportunity, as she is being given a chance to learn something new and to grow.

Often times many of us find ourselves in a comfort zone. We are comfortable, content and may even think ourselves to be happy. Everything is familiar; we feel safe and secure. But life can become boring and mundane when lived from our comfort zone. Don’t you think?  Not only that, but when we remain stuck in our comfort zone, we become stunted. We don’t try or discover new things, explore, take any risk and most importantly we don’t challenge ourselves, learn or grow.

Share this:

5 Books to Read for Personal Development and to Help you Soar

Photo by Gabby K on Pexels.com

In my last post I told you that this week I would be sharing with you, the top 5 books I read in 2020.

When something is good or you have a good find you want to share it with others, don’t you? So, I want to recommend to you my readers, what I found to be the 5 most impactful books I read in 2020.  Here they are. They are not listed in any particular order, since I found them all to be equally great.

Share this:

The 5 Most Important Life Lessons I have Learned by age 45

Photo by Clay Banks at Unsplash.com

As raindrops pound on my rooftop, I feel thankful that I forgoed plans to spend the afternoon at the park. Since the evening before, they have been relentless; behaving like a jealous lover, demanding that the object of his love open up the door and let him in. Commitment and consistency whispers my name. Commitment to myself and my progress and to you, my readers. I respond. Resisting the urge to spend the afternoon under the covers, I bundle myself up into a sweater and sit half excited and half reluctant at my desk. A smile of satisfaction beams across my face as I complete this first paragraph. It is the eve of my 45th birthday!

 “Mummy you getting old”, my daughter jokingly said to me; but celebrating my 45th birthday feels more like a milestone. During the preceding weeks I had been contemplating a lot about the lessons I have learned during the 45 years granted to me on this earth. After all, “the unexamined life is not worth living”, so says Socrates. Thus, I have chosen to share with you what I believe to be the 5 most important lessons I have learned.

Share this:

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén